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THE GERMAN GIRL – ARMANDO LUCAS CORREA

 

1501158783

Where Do You Go When Home No Longer Wants You?

1939. Berlin is full of marching soldiers and red, white, and black flags. Eleven-year-old Hannah Rosenthal knows she and her family must escape, but how? And where can they go? Beautiful, Haunting and Gut-wrenching. Truly a story that will touch your heart. Just imagine living where you weren’t accepted because of your religion. A place where happiness disappeared in the blink of an eye and only terror and fear linger in the four corners of your house and your mind. Then to see hope and paradise in a ship named St.Louis that will bring you to a new Country that was suppose to be a place to keep them safe but turned to be terror and agony for many years. I promise you the very first line of this book will pull you in and you will not want to set it down. Tears flooded my eyes many times throughout, you just want to reach in and take all the pain away.

A stunningly ambitious and beautiful debut novel, perfect for fans of Sarah’s Key and All the Light We Cannot See, the story of a twelve-year-old girl’s harrowing experience fleeing Nazi-occupied Germany with her family and best friend, only to discover that the overseas asylum they had been promised is an illusion.

Before everything changed, Hannah Rosenthal lived a charmed life. But now, in 1939, the streets of Berlin are draped with red, white, and black flags; her family’s fine possessions are hauled away; and they are no longer welcome in the places that once felt like home. Hannah and her best friend, Leo Martin, make a pact: come what may, they promise to have a future together.

Nobody heard my cries anymore; nobody bothered about them. Papa told me I was strong. I would survive whatever happened. But not Mama. The pain was gnawing away at her. She was the child in a house where daylight was no longer allowed. For four months, she had been sobbing each night, ever since the city was covered in broken glass and filled with the constant stench of gunpowder, metal, and smoke. That was when they started planning our escape. They decided we’d abandon the house where I was born, and forbade me to go to school, where nobody liked me anymore.

A glimmer of hope appears in the form of the St. Louis, a transatlantic liner that can provide Jews safe passage to Cuba. After a frantic search to obtain visas, the Rosenthals and the Martins depart on the luxurious ship bound for Havana. Life on board the St. Louis is like a surreal holiday for these refugees, with masquerade balls, exquisite meals, and polite, respectful service. But soon ominous rumors from Cuba overshadow the celebratory atmosphere, and the ship that once was their salvation seems likely to become their death sentence. Hannah and Leo must make an impossible choice or risk losing everything that matters.

There are moments when it’s better to accept it’s all over, that there’s nothing more to be done. Give up and abandon hope :surrender.That’s how I felt by then. I didn’t believe in miracles.This had happened to us because we insisted on changing a destiny that was already written. We didn’t have any rights, we couldn’t reinvent history. We were condemned to be deceived from the moment we came into the world.

Seven decades later in New York City, on her twelfth birthday, Anna Rosen receives a package from Hannah, a great-aunt she has never met but who raised her deceased father. In an attempt to piece together her father’s mysterious past, Anna and her mother travel to Havana to meet this elderly relative. Hannah tells them of her astonishing journey on the St. Louis and, for the first time, reveals how she and Leo honored the solemn pact they had made. By connecting the pain of the past to the mysteries of the present, Hannah gives her young great-niece a sense of their shared histories, forever intertwining their lives, honoring those they loved and cruelly lost.

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Children on Board the S.S. St. Louis

 

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